Hotchkiss’s Conjectures on Hyperdimensional Scaling

Hotchkiss’s conjectures on hyperdimensional polytopes delve into the fascinating and complex world of higher-dimensional geometry, particularly focusing on the relationships and scaling behaviors of geometric shapes as they extend beyond three dimensions.

The Intrigue of Pi
One of the key observations in Hotchkiss’s conjectures is the consistent relationship between the diameter of hyperspheres (or “n-spheres”) and the space their boundaries enclose, which is always related to π. This relationship holds true across dimensions, from circles in 2D to spheres in 3D, and extends to hyperspheres in 4D and beyond. This suggests a profound and intrinsic connection between π and the geometry of hyperspheres, regardless of the dimensional context.

2D Space:

  1. A circle (“1 sphere”) with a diameter of 1 unit exists.
  2. The circumference of the circle is π linear units.

3D Space:

  1. A sphere (“2 sphere”) with a diameter of 1 unit exists.
  2. The surface area of the 2 sphere is π square units.

4D Space:

  1. A hypersphere (“3 sphere”) with a diameter of 1 unit exists.
  2. The surface area of the 3 sphere is π cubic units.

The Shrinking Polytopes
Hotchkiss also explores the behavior of specific shapes within these hyperspheres, particularly focusing on “regular 6-sided” objects. In 2D, this would be a hexagon inside a circle, and in 3D, a cube inside a sphere. As we move to higher dimensions, the relative space occupied by these shapes compared to their enclosing hyperspheres appears to shrink. This observation hints at an exponential decrease in the ratio of the space occupied by these polytopes as the dimensionality increases.

Hexagon, Cube, or something more? Source: https://gifer.com/en/AqCd

2D Space:

  1. A circle (“1 sphere”) with a diameter of 1 unit exists.
  2. The distance between the origin and the circle on any axis is 0.5 units, which is the radius of the circle.
  3. Inscribe a regular hexagon within the 1 unit circle, with each vertex touching the unit circle.
  4. The length of one side of the hexagon in the circle is 0.5 units, which is equal to the radius.
  5. The diagonal distance from one vertex of the hexagon to the opposing vertex is equal to 1 unit.
  6. The perimeter of the hexagon is 3 units.
  7. The circumference of the circle is π linear units.
  8. The ratio of the perimeter of the hexagon to the circumference of the circle is 3:π.

3D Space:

  1. A sphere (“2 sphere”) with a diameter of 1 unit exists.
  2. Inscribe a hexahedron/cube within the sphere, with each of the 8 vertices touching the surface of the sphere.
  3. The body diagonal of the cube is 1 unit.
  4. The length of one side of the cube in the sphere is sqrt(1/3) units.
  5. The surface area of a side of the cube is 1/3 square units.
  6. The sum of the surface area of the six sides of the cube is 2 square units.
  7. The surface area of the 2 sphere is π square units.
  8. The ratio of the cube to the sphere is 2:π.

4d Space…?:

We can’t know for sure the dimensions of the 6 sided regular polytope based on our current understanding.

A Formula Emerges
Based on patterns observed in 2D and 3D, Hotchkiss proposes a formula to predict the ratio of the space occupied by these regular polytopes within hyperspheres in any dimension. This formula suggests that the ratio decreases exponentially with increasing dimensions. However, defining what constitutes a “regular 6-sided” object in 4D and higher dimensions presents a significant challenge, as the concept of regularity becomes more complex in higher-dimensional spaces.

Hotchkiss’s Conjectures on Hyperdimensional Scaling

  • Pi’s Dimensional Consistency: The (n-1)-dimensional surface content of an n-dimensional hypersphere with a diameter of 1 unit is consistently π, measured in (n-1)-dimensional units, across all dimensions.
  • Polytope Surface Content Ratio: The ratio of the (n-1)-dimensional “surface content” of an n-dimensional “regular 6-celled polytope” with a longest diagonal of 1 unit, to the (n-1)-dimensional surface content of its corresponding n-dimensional hypersphere (also with a diameter of 1 unit), is given by:
  • Ratio = [3 * 0.5^(n-1)] / π , where the “surface content” is measured in (n-1)-dimensional units.

Challenges and the Thrill of the Unknown
The exploration of higher-dimensional polytopes is fraught with challenges, primarily due to the abstract nature of higher dimensions and the need for new mathematical tools to rigorously define and prove these conjectures. The journey into higher-dimensional geometry is not only about understanding existing patterns but also about discovering new mathematical principles and potentially new branches of mathematics.

The Journey Continues
Hotchkiss’s conjectures highlight the beauty and complexity of pattern recognition in mathematics and the endless possibilities that lie in the abstract realm of higher dimensions. This exploration is a testament to the ever-evolving nature of mathematical inquiry and the continuous quest for knowledge and understanding in the field of geometry.

These conjectures align with the broader study of higher-dimensional polytopes and hyperspheres, as discussed in various sources.

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