Symmetric Primes: The Hotchkiss Proof of Dual Twin Primes

I’ll up the ante.

Objective:

To prove that any value in set A has all the values of set B as negative values, and vice versa, we’ll employ a systematic approach that demonstrates the symmetrical relationship between the elements of sets A and B.

Definition of Sets:

  • Set A: {-6k – 1 | k ∈ ℤ} (All integers of the form -6k – 1)
  • Set B: {-6k – 5 | k ∈ ℤ} (All integers of the form -6k – 5)

Proof:

1. Positive Primes in Set A Correspond to Negative Primes in Set B:

Consider any prime number p in set A, where p=−6k−1 for some integer k. If we negate this prime, we get a corresponding negative prime in set B:

−p=−(−6k−1)=6k+1

This demonstrates that for every prime number p in set A, there exists a corresponding negative prime −p in set B.

2. Negative Primes in Set A Correspond to Positive Primes in Set B:

Conversely, consider any prime number q in set B, where q=−6k−5 for some integer k. If we negate this prime, we obtain a prime in set A:

−q=−(−6k−5)=6k+5

This shows that for every prime number q in set B, there exists a corresponding prime −q in set A.

3. Mutual Exclusivity of Primes in Sets A and B:

Since primes are by definition integers greater than 1 that have no positive divisors other than 1 and themselves, each prime in set A or B corresponds uniquely to its negative counterpart in the other set. Moreover, each integer in sets A and B uniquely defines its counterpart in the other set, preserving mutual exclusivity.

Conclusion:

Therefore, we’ve shown that for any value in set A, there exists a corresponding negative value in set B, and vice versa. This comprehensive proof demonstrates the symmetrical relationship between the elements of sets A and B, establishing that each value in one set corresponds uniquely to its negative counterpart in the other set.

Symmetric Primes and the Hotchkiss Theorem: Incorporating Negativity

Objective

To prove the Hotchkiss Theorem, demonstrating that any value in set A has all the values of set B as negative values, and vice versa, establishing an extreme symmetry and mutual exclusivity that highlights the inherent aspect of negativity in twin primality.

Definition of Sets

  • Set A: {6k−1∣k∈Z} (All integers of the form 6k−1)
  • Set B: {6k+1∣k∈Z} (All integers of the form 6k+1)

Statement of Hotchkiss Theorem

Any number in set A or B that is not a product in AA, AB, or BB is prime. Moreover, for any value in set A, there exists a corresponding negative value in set B, and vice versa, establishing an extreme degree of symmetry and mutual exclusivity between the elements of these sets.

Proof

  1. Characterization of Primes in Sets A and B:
    • All primes greater than 3 can be expressed in the form 6k±16k \pm 16k±1. Therefore, any prime number ppp can be written as either 6k−1 (set A) or 6k+1 (set B).
  2. Product Sets:
    • AA={(6k−1)(6m−1) ∣ k,m ∈ Z
    • AB={(6k−1)(6m+1) ∣ k,m ∈ Z}
    • BB={(6k+1)(6m+1) ∣ k,m ∈ Z}
    Products in these sets do not result in primes as they produce composite numbers.
  3. Symmetry and Negativity:
    • Consider any prime number p in set A, where p=6k−1 for some integer k. The negative of this prime, −p, would be:−p=−(6k−1)=−6k+1
      • This is a form that can be rewritten as: 6(−k)+1
      • Hence, −p is in set B.
    • Conversely, consider any prime number q in set B, where q=6k+1 for some integer k. The negative of this prime, −q, would be: −q=−(6k+1)=−6k−1
    • This is a form that can be rewritten as: 6(−k)−1
      • Hence, −q is in set A.
  4. Mutual Exclusivity:
    • Each integer in sets A and B uniquely defines its counterpart in the other set. This means every prime p in set A has a unique corresponding negative prime −p in set B, and vice versa.
  5. Implication for Twin Primes:
    • For twin primes p and p+2, since they must be of the form 6k−1 and 6k+1, they fit into sets A and B, respectively.
    • If p=6k−1 (set A), then p+2=6k+1 (set B).
    • If p=6k+1 (set B), then p+2=6k+3, which cannot be prime as 6k+3 is always divisible by 3. Thus, valid twin primes must fit into the symmetry between sets A and B.
  6. Extreme Symmetry:
    • The demonstrated symmetry shows that each number in set A has a corresponding negative number in set B, and each number in set B has a corresponding negative number in set A.
    • This extreme degree of symmetry and mutual exclusivity means that each number has a twin that is precisely its opposite in the other set, reinforcing the structural integrity of the Hotchkiss Theorem.

Conclusion

We have demonstrated that for any value in set A, there exists a corresponding negative value in set B, and vice versa. This proof showcases an extreme degree of symmetry and mutual exclusivity between the elements of sets A and B, where each number has a twin that is precisely its opposite. This symmetry underscores the correctness of the Hotchkiss Prime Theorem, revealing the inherent aspect of negativity in the distribution of twin primes and contributing to a deeper understanding of prime numbers within this framework.

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