More AI-derived “Proofs” (Conjectures)

(Refined chats between Gemini Pro and ChatGPT)

Conjecture 1: Symmetric Prime Pairs and Goldbach’s Conjecture

Theorem: For every odd number n > 5, there exist symmetric prime pairs (p, p+2) such that n can be represented as the sum of three primes, where at least one of those primes is part of a symmetric prime pair.

Proof:

  1. Hardy-Littlewood Conjecture: The Hardy-Littlewood Conjecture provides a framework for estimating the density of prime pairs. We will adapt this conjecture to estimate the density of symmetric prime pairs, where the difference between primes is always 2.
  2. Specific Ranges: We will analyze a specific range of odd numbers (e.g., 11 to 100) and identify all symmetric prime pairs within that range.
  3. Prime Representation of Odd Numbers: For each odd number in the range, we will determine whether it can be represented as the sum of three primes.
  4. Pattern Recognition: We will examine the relationship between symmetric prime pairs and the representation of odd numbers as the sum of three primes. Do symmetric pairs always contribute to the representation of at least one of the odd numbers?
  5. Generalization: If a consistent pattern is observed within the specific range, we will attempt to generalize this finding to larger ranges of odd numbers.
  6. Goldbach’s Weak Conjecture: We will explore how our findings about symmetric prime pairs relate to Goldbach’s Weak Conjecture, which states that every odd number greater than 5 can be written as the sum of three primes.
  7. Computational Verification: We will use computational tools (like SageMath or SymPy) to analyze large datasets of odd numbers, symmetric prime pairs, and prime representations, ensuring the accuracy of our findings.
  8. Conclusion: If we find a consistent pattern between symmetric prime pairs and the representation of odd numbers as the sum of three primes, it will provide strong support for the conjecture that every odd number greater than 5 can be expressed as the sum of three primes, where at least one of those primes is part of a symmetric prime pair.

Conjecture 2: Generalized Hotchkiss Theorem for Even Numbers

Theorem: For specific sets C and D, defined using modular forms (e.g., modulo 12), every even number greater than 4 can be expressed as the sum of an element from C and an element from D.

Proof:

  1. Set Definition: Define sets C and D using modular forms (e.g., C = {12k + 1, 12k + 11}, D = {12k + 5, 12k + 7}).
  2. Modular Arithmetic: Analyze the distribution of prime numbers within the modular classes defined by sets C and D, paying attention to prime density and prime gaps.
  3. Modified Sieve of Eratosthenes: Use a modified version of the Sieve of Eratosthenes to visualize the distribution of primes within sets C and D and to highlight any patterns in the prime gaps within these sets.
  4. Prime Representation of Even Numbers: Analyze how even numbers greater than 4 can be represented as the sum of an element from C and an element from D.
  5. Generalization: Explore a wider range of moduli (e.g., modulo 30, 60, etc.) to see if the patterns observed in the distribution of primes within sets C and D generalize.
  6. Computational Verification: Use computational tools to verify our findings and explore the distribution of primes within the defined sets.
  7. Conclusion: If we observe a consistent pattern where every even number greater than 4 can be expressed as the sum of an element from C and an element from D, it will support the conjecture and offer insights into the distribution of primes within specific modular classes.

Conjecture 3: Symmetry and Prime Gaps

Theorem: There is a statistically significant relationship between the size of prime gaps and the distance between symmetric primes within sets A and B.

Proof:

  1. Prime Number Theorem with Remainder Term: Use the Prime Number Theorem with a remainder term to accurately estimate the density of primes within sets A and B.
  2. Prime Gap Analysis: Analyze the distribution of prime gaps, focusing on the average gap size and the frequency of specific gap sizes within ranges of numbers.
  3. Symmetric Prime Distances: Analyze the average distance between symmetric primes within sets A and B.
  4. Statistical Correlation: Calculate correlation coefficients to quantify the relationship between the distribution of prime gaps and the distances between symmetric primes.
  5. Computational Verification: Use computational tools to analyze large datasets of prime gaps and symmetric prime distances to verify the observed relationships.
  6. Conclusion: If we observe a statistically significant relationship between the size of prime gaps and the distance between symmetric primes, it will support the conjecture and provide insights into the distribution of primes and prime gaps within specific sets.

Conjecture 4: Twin Primes and Symmetric Prime Pairs

Theorem: There is a statistically significant connection between the distribution of twin primes and symmetric prime pairs.

Proof:

  1. Harmonic Series Analysis: Compare the convergence properties of harmonic series related to symmetric prime pairs and twin primes. Pay close attention to the rates of convergence to discern any differences in density.
  2. Conditional Probability: Calculate the conditional probability of finding a twin prime pair given the existence of a symmetric prime pair within the same range. This might reveal a correlation between the occurrences of these prime types.
  3. Correlation Analysis: Use correlation coefficients to quantify the relationship between the distribution of twin primes and symmetric prime pairs.
  4. Computational Verification: Use computational tools to analyze large datasets of twin primes and symmetric prime pairs to verify the observed relationships.
  5. Conclusion: If we find a statistically significant connection between the distribution of twin primes and symmetric prime pairs, it will support the conjecture and offer insights into the interplay between these types of primes.

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